Modular Cracking Technology - What is it?

Introduction and a short description of the technology of the full mineralisation of solid and semi-solid organic waste.

 

The offered technology is a patented solution and is based on a catalytic low temperature thermolysis technology and gasification combined with a catalytic and adsorptive treatment of post‐pyrolytic gases with recovery of post‐reaction heat. The technology, which is not based on incineration (burning), does not produce additional byproducts such as NOx, dioxins, furans, CO, methane etc.

The maximum temperature of the process is not higher than 750°C. 

Our MCT technology is CE certified and does not exhaust any toxic element.

 

 

This technology provides on average:

  • Waste volume reduction: 20 – 100 fold
  • Waste mass reduction: 15 – 80 fold
  • Total waste dehydration
  • Total waste deodorisation
  • Total oxidation of organic compounds, including bacteria and viruses, to H2O and CO2 


Diagram of MCT waste Processor



MCT technical process description

After treatment of the input waste by separation, crushing, and shredding to the required fraction of up to 50 mm in diameter, it is transported by the conveyor to the reaction chamber storage reservoir from which the reaction

chamber is filled under the law of gravity.

At the very beginning of the process, gas burners heat the mineralization chamber up to approx. 450o C and will be switched off after they have reached the operating temperature for the self-sustaining process. From there on no

additional energy from external sources is needed, therefore it is no incineration.

 

When the chamber is filled with waste, all moisture up to a temperature of 200o C is evaporated to gas and the mineralization, gasification and utilization process begins.

Temperatures from 250 to 450o C depending on the type of waste are generated in this first process stage.

The mineralization process dries the material and results in the subsequent decomposition of the material. Carbon is gasified to CO2 or other organic components that are decomposed into CO2 and H2O in the catalysts. All carbon is used up as ongoing reactions shorten the gas hydrocarbon chains that are catalytically decomposed into CO2 and H2O and inert material, depending on what is in the organic material.

 

Metal and glass components in the waste are not oxidized in the mineralization process due to a low process temperature and negligible oxygen presence of 3 %. Therefore they remain unchanged in the process. It can be

stated that the process, which occurs in the reaction chamber, is anaerobic.

Catalytic mineralization is a process in which a mineral is built out of an organic substance.

 

The input waste volume is reduced 20 – 100 times depending on its composition. Processed and utilized waste is discharged from the reaction chamber in the form of a fine mineral powder and is transported from the reservoir located at its lower part using a staging conveyor to a collecting container.

 

After treatment of the input waste by separation, crushing, and shredding to the required fraction of up to 50 mm in diameter, it is transported by the conveyor to the reaction chamber storage reservoir from which the reaction

chamber is filled under the law of gravity.

At the very beginning of the process, gas burners heat the mineralization chamber up to approx. 450o C and will be switched off after they have reached the operating temperature for the self-sustaining process. From there on no

additional energy from external sources is needed, therefore it is no incineration. When the chamber is filled with waste, all moisture up to a temperature of 200o C is evaporated to gas and the mineralization, gasification and utilization process begins. 

Temperatures from 250 to 450o C depending on the type of waste are generated in this first process stage.

The mineralization process dries the material and results in the subsequent decomposition of the material. Carbon is gasified to CO2 or other organic components that are decomposed into CO2 and H2O in the catalysts. All carbon is used up as ongoing reactions shorten the gas hydrocarbon chains that are catalytically decomposed into CO2 and H2O and inert material, depending on what is in the organic material.

 

 

Metal and glass components in the waste are not oxidized in the mineralization process due to a low process temperature and negligible oxygen presence of 3 %. Therefore they remain unchanged in the process. It can be

stated that the process, which occurs in the reaction chamber, is anaerobic.

Catalytic mineralization is a process in which a mineral is built out of an organic substance.

The input waste volume is reduced 20 – 100 times depending on its composition. Processed and utilized waste is discharged from the reaction chamber in the form of a fine mineral powder and is transported from the reservoir located at its lower part using a staging conveyor to a collecting container.

 


Data from measurements on existing plants

Temperature in the 1st stage:

Depending on the type and moisture content of the waste from 250 °C to 450 °C.

Gas composition after the 1st stage

Syngas (mainly CO, CH4, H, various pollutants)

Temperature in the 2nd stage (catalytic combustion of the syngas):

Depending on the composition of the syngas 650 °C to 700 °C

Gas composition after the 2nd stage (i.e. after the catalyst)

Purest CO2, purest water vapour, all pollutants well below the limits allowed by EU directives

 

MCT Project Example 

Efficiency of the MCT process:

Available heat energy after the catalyst relative to the energy content of the supplied waste approx. 85% to 95%.

Efficiency of electricity generation:

Heat Exchanger + Steam Turbine + Generator approx. 42%

The overall efficiency of the whole system (i.e. generated electrical energy relative to the energy content of the waste introduced) is approx. 36% to 40%.



Proces flow diagram MCT proces




Waste into energy flow MCT today and tomorrow


Production of electricity

  • Considering the production of electricity - today the steam produced in the MCT process is primarily used.
  • The steam drives steam turbines, and they drive generators for producing electric energy.
  • Steam turbines and generators may or may not be an integral part of the MCT plant.

 

MCT technology is constantly evolving and improvements are underway, such as hydrogen purification and hydrogen fuel combustion/cell, as well as thermolytic converters that directly convert heat into electricity. This is a guarantee that the plant will certainly not be outdated and ready for "TOMORROW"!